Teaching Media Literacy to High School Students


The chart below shows the student expectations from the media literacy portion of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) high school reading strand. This vertical format makes it clearer how the student expectations change and increase in sophistication across grade levels.
When studying these expectations, it is important to identify what students were taught previously, as well as the embedded skills within each expectation. Identifying these prerequisite skills will help teachers determine what scaffolds students will need to be successful. Beneath each expectation are questions for teachers to consider as they plan how to teach the expectation. Below the questions is a link to a page of resources that apply to the expectation.


TEKS: Reading/Media Literacy.

Students use comprehension skills to analyze how words, images, graphics, and sounds work together in various forms to impact meaning. Students are expected to:
English 1
English 2
English 3
English 4
12(A) compare and contrast how events are presented and information is communicated by visual images (e.g., graphic art illustrations, news photographs) versus non-visual texts;
12(A) evaluate how messages presented in media reflect social and cultural views in ways different from traditional texts;
Questions to consider:
Questions to consider:
Resources for teaching students
Resources for teaching students
12(B) analyze how messages in media are conveyed through visual and sound techniques (e.g., editing, reaction shots, sequencing, background music);
12(B) evaluate the interactions of different techniques (e.g., layout, pictures, typeface in print media, images, text, sound in electronic journalism) used in multi-layered media;
Questions to consider:
Questions to consider:
Resources for teaching students
Resources for teaching students
12(C) compare and contrastcoverage of the same event in various media (e.g., newspapers, television, documentaries, blogs, Internet);
12(C) examine how individual perception or bias in coverage of the same event influences the audience;
12(C) evaluate the objectivity of coverage of the same event in various types of media;
evaluate how one issue or event is represented across various media to understand the notions of bias, audience, and purpose;
Questions to consider:
Questions to consider:
Questions to consider:
Questions to consider:
Resources for teaching students
Resources for teaching students
Resources for teaching students
Resources for teaching students
12(D) evaluate changes in formality and tone within the same medium for specific audiences and purposes.
12(D) evaluate changes in formality and tone across various media for different audiences and purposes
Questions to consider:
Questions to consider:
Resources for teaching students
Resources for teaching students


















typing beneath the chart